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Boost your Blender productivity

Navigating Blender's extensive array of menus, submenus, and shortcuts can be overwhelming. Throughout my career, I've developed a workflow that leans heavily on custom mouse mappings, maximizing efficiency.

DIFFICULTY

Intermediate

Category

UI

back to blender tips

Boost your Blender productivity

Navigating Blender's extensive array of menus, submenus, and shortcuts can be overwhelming. Throughout my career, I've developed a workflow that leans heavily on custom mouse mappings, maximizing efficiency.

DIFFICULTY

Intermediate

Category

UI

back to blender tips

Boost your Blender productivity

Navigating Blender's extensive array of menus, submenus, and shortcuts can be overwhelming. Throughout my career, I've developed a workflow that leans heavily on custom mouse mappings, maximizing efficiency.

DIFFICULTY

Intermediate

Category

UI

back to blender tips

Boost your Blender productivity

Navigating Blender's extensive array of menus, submenus, and shortcuts can be overwhelming. Throughout my career, I've developed a workflow that leans heavily on custom mouse mappings, maximizing efficiency.

DIFFICULTY

Intermediate

Category

UI

Get the script(s) here

Get the script(s) here

  1. Get a gaming mouse, install its corresponding software, and create a macro profile

Gaming mice offer great ergonomics and extra buttons. Choose carefully, as it may last your entire career. I use a Corsair Ironclaw but advise caution due to its build quality. It works with iCue software, allowing you to set up a Blender-specific profile for automatic switching.


Example of a Blender-specific profile, linked to multiple versions of Blender




  1. Use the Quick favorites menu or better, get the Pie Menu Editor

Yellow = good (Quick Favorites)Red = better (PME)

The Quick Favorites menu in Blender, triggered by the Q key, is a versatile, context-sensitive menu for fast access to various functions. Despite its usefulness, its capabilities are limited. Consider investing in the Pie Menu Editor, although not inexpensive, it expands your customization options and features significantly.




  1. Become a power user of the Pie Menu Editor

After getting familiar with the Pie Menu Editor's (PME) complex interface, you'll start to identify your preferences. I favor a combination of Pie Menus and Pop-up submenus for their efficiency. I recommend designing various menus for particular contexts or tasks. For instance:

Modeling Tools: Ideal for Object and Edit modes, this menu enhances scene setup and mesh modeling workflows.

View Tools: Offers quick access to camera shortcuts, view layers, rendering settings, and 3D viewport configurations.








  1. Optimize your PME keymaps, and map them to your mouse

To integrate your Pie Menu Editor (PME) menus with your mouse, map a mouse button to the PME keymap, typically replacing the Quick Favorites menu with the Q key.

Shift, CTRL and ALT are your friends

Remember, modifiers like Shift, Ctrl, and Alt are invaluable. Aim to assign all your PME menus to the same mouse button, varying access through different modifier keys. Here's a strategy:

  • Modeling Tools: Directly via the mouse button assigned to Q

  • View Tools: Shift + Mouse Button (Q)

  • Animation Tools: Alt + Mouse Button (Q)

  • Guide Mesh <> Final Mesh Editor: Ctrl + mouse button (Q)


Snapshot of my PME interface and the different menus and submenus

  1. Get a gaming mouse, install its corresponding software, and create a macro profile

Gaming mice offer great ergonomics and extra buttons. Choose carefully, as it may last your entire career. I use a Corsair Ironclaw but advise caution due to its build quality. It works with iCue software, allowing you to set up a Blender-specific profile for automatic switching.


Example of a Blender-specific profile, linked to multiple versions of Blender




  1. Use the Quick favorites menu or better, get the Pie Menu Editor

Yellow = good (Quick Favorites)Red = better (PME)

The Quick Favorites menu in Blender, triggered by the Q key, is a versatile, context-sensitive menu for fast access to various functions. Despite its usefulness, its capabilities are limited. Consider investing in the Pie Menu Editor, although not inexpensive, it expands your customization options and features significantly.




  1. Become a power user of the Pie Menu Editor

After getting familiar with the Pie Menu Editor's (PME) complex interface, you'll start to identify your preferences. I favor a combination of Pie Menus and Pop-up submenus for their efficiency. I recommend designing various menus for particular contexts or tasks. For instance:

Modeling Tools: Ideal for Object and Edit modes, this menu enhances scene setup and mesh modeling workflows.

View Tools: Offers quick access to camera shortcuts, view layers, rendering settings, and 3D viewport configurations.








  1. Optimize your PME keymaps, and map them to your mouse

To integrate your Pie Menu Editor (PME) menus with your mouse, map a mouse button to the PME keymap, typically replacing the Quick Favorites menu with the Q key.

Shift, CTRL and ALT are your friends

Remember, modifiers like Shift, Ctrl, and Alt are invaluable. Aim to assign all your PME menus to the same mouse button, varying access through different modifier keys. Here's a strategy:

  • Modeling Tools: Directly via the mouse button assigned to Q

  • View Tools: Shift + Mouse Button (Q)

  • Animation Tools: Alt + Mouse Button (Q)

  • Guide Mesh <> Final Mesh Editor: Ctrl + mouse button (Q)


Snapshot of my PME interface and the different menus and submenus

  1. Get a gaming mouse, install its corresponding software, and create a macro profile

Gaming mice offer great ergonomics and extra buttons. Choose carefully, as it may last your entire career. I use a Corsair Ironclaw but advise caution due to its build quality. It works with iCue software, allowing you to set up a Blender-specific profile for automatic switching.


Example of a Blender-specific profile, linked to multiple versions of Blender




  1. Use the Quick favorites menu or better, get the Pie Menu Editor

Yellow = good (Quick Favorites)Red = better (PME)

The Quick Favorites menu in Blender, triggered by the Q key, is a versatile, context-sensitive menu for fast access to various functions. Despite its usefulness, its capabilities are limited. Consider investing in the Pie Menu Editor, although not inexpensive, it expands your customization options and features significantly.




  1. Become a power user of the Pie Menu Editor

After getting familiar with the Pie Menu Editor's (PME) complex interface, you'll start to identify your preferences. I favor a combination of Pie Menus and Pop-up submenus for their efficiency. I recommend designing various menus for particular contexts or tasks. For instance:

Modeling Tools: Ideal for Object and Edit modes, this menu enhances scene setup and mesh modeling workflows.

View Tools: Offers quick access to camera shortcuts, view layers, rendering settings, and 3D viewport configurations.








  1. Optimize your PME keymaps, and map them to your mouse

To integrate your Pie Menu Editor (PME) menus with your mouse, map a mouse button to the PME keymap, typically replacing the Quick Favorites menu with the Q key.

Shift, CTRL and ALT are your friends

Remember, modifiers like Shift, Ctrl, and Alt are invaluable. Aim to assign all your PME menus to the same mouse button, varying access through different modifier keys. Here's a strategy:

  • Modeling Tools: Directly via the mouse button assigned to Q

  • View Tools: Shift + Mouse Button (Q)

  • Animation Tools: Alt + Mouse Button (Q)

  • Guide Mesh <> Final Mesh Editor: Ctrl + mouse button (Q)


Snapshot of my PME interface and the different menus and submenus

Happy Blending!

Happy Blending!

©2024 1P2D

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